Tag: art

bitchville:


Turns out the jellyfish can’t go in a regular fish tank because they get sucked into the filtration intakes and liquefied. In this tank, however, the water flow is carefully designed so jellies do not get sucked into pump intakes. The tanks do not contain any rocks, plants or other fish that could damage the delicate tissue of the jellyfish. The aesthetic style is a display of modern minimalism that is very distinct from a regular fish tank.  Yes, all of our jellyfish are saltwater species.
Contrary to popular belief, a saltwater aquarium is not any more difficult to maintain than a freshwater aquarium. It requires only a few extra minutes every two weeks to measure and adjust the salinity. 
A jellyfish tank is easier to maintain than a regular fish aquarium. Jellyfish have a lower metabolism than fish so only small filtration units are required for jellyfish. Additionally, jellyfish tanks do not have any rocks, plants or corals, which are difficult to prune and clean. The jellyfish must be fed once a day and 25% of the water must be changed every two weeks. 
The package comes with custom LEDs that cause the translucent jellyfish to glow. Colored lights can be used to make the jellyfish glow different colors.




So pretty. Seriously, I want this for my apartment haha. Plus it’s lower maintenance and prettier than goldfish swimming in circles. Maybe in the future I will get one as a living art display. Or maybe I’ll get my shiba inu kekeke. Cutest dogs ever.

bitchville:

Turns out the jellyfish can’t go in a regular fish tank because they get sucked into the filtration intakes and liquefied. In this tank, however, the water flow is carefully designed so jellies do not get sucked into pump intakes. The tanks do not contain any rocks, plants or other fish that could damage the delicate tissue of the jellyfish. The aesthetic style is a display of modern minimalism that is very distinct from a regular fish tank.  Yes, all of our jellyfish are saltwater species.

Contrary to popular belief, a saltwater aquarium is not any more difficult to maintain than a freshwater aquarium. It requires only a few extra minutes every two weeks to measure and adjust the salinity. 

A jellyfish tank is easier to maintain than a regular fish aquarium. Jellyfish have a lower metabolism than fish so only small filtration units are required for jellyfish. Additionally, jellyfish tanks do not have any rocks, plants or corals, which are difficult to prune and clean. The jellyfish must be fed once a day and 25% of the water must be changed every two weeks. 

The package comes with custom LEDs that cause the translucent jellyfish to glow. Colored lights can be used to make the jellyfish glow different colors.

So pretty. Seriously, I want this for my apartment haha. Plus it’s lower maintenance and prettier than goldfish swimming in circles. Maybe in the future I will get one as a living art display. Or maybe I’ll get my shiba inu kekeke. Cutest dogs ever.

(via grayscalerainbow)

Day Seventy-Two—Fort Mason CenterAt the Marina District before the usual SF family visit. The more I explore the other parts of the City, the more I love it. Gahhh, why couldn’t UCSF have been undegrad!? Yupp so this was at the Renegade Craft Fair. There were some freaking amazing local handcrafts there. Such ash those silk-and-wood crafted lanterns. I also really liked the many prints there along with a woodcut, Coptic-stitched journal. Of course, some products seemed a little overpriced, but they were nonetheless worthwhile to browse. I really wanted to buy a set of four bumblebee posters, but it was $30, so I settled for a cheaper poster that had metallic ink :) Also picked up a whole bunch of free postcards and business cards; hoping to use those to decorate my room next year. After visiting the Fair, it has given me quite some inspiration for things I want to do, like decorating with business cards, making my own print poster, doing Coptic-stitch bookbinding again, and so much more. Wish I could have stayed a little longer to browse more. I’d definitely like to go again next year.

Day Seventy-Two—Fort Mason Center
At the Marina District before the usual SF family visit. The more I explore the other parts of the City, the more I love it. Gahhh, why couldn’t UCSF have been undegrad!? Yupp so this was at the Renegade Craft Fair. There were some freaking amazing local handcrafts there. Such ash those silk-and-wood crafted lanterns. I also really liked the many prints there along with a woodcut, Coptic-stitched journal. Of course, some products seemed a little overpriced, but they were nonetheless worthwhile to browse. I really wanted to buy a set of four bumblebee posters, but it was $30, so I settled for a cheaper poster that had metallic ink :) Also picked up a whole bunch of free postcards and business cards; hoping to use those to decorate my room next year. After visiting the Fair, it has given me quite some inspiration for things I want to do, like decorating with business cards, making my own print poster, doing Coptic-stitch bookbinding again, and so much more. Wish I could have stayed a little longer to browse more. I’d definitely like to go again next year.

Day Seventy-One—Fremont Main LibraryWhile going to the library to check out some books (seriously, I’ve been definitely checking out more books than I can read at once lately), I accidentally stumbled upon the Arabic calligraphy exhibit at the library. It was quite an amazing accidental discovery. Arabic is probably one of my favorite writing systems (along with Chinese and Greek)—it’s just so organic, flowy, and beautiful, and perfect for calligraphy. I love how it’s so easy to literally create images out of words with Arabic calligraphy. My favorite, though, was the Sini calligraphy, a fusion of Arabic written to imitate Chinese script. The Sino-Arabic callipgraphy piece was done by Noor Deen Mi Guangjiang, who is apparantly the most famous Chinese Arabic calligrapher, and reads “assalamu alaikum” or “peace be with you.” Cultural fusion never ceases to amaze me.

Day Seventy-One—Fremont Main Library
While going to the library to check out some books (seriously, I’ve been definitely checking out more books than I can read at once lately), I accidentally stumbled upon the Arabic calligraphy exhibit at the library. It was quite an amazing accidental discovery. Arabic is probably one of my favorite writing systems (along with Chinese and Greek)—it’s just so organic, flowy, and beautiful, and perfect for calligraphy. I love how it’s so easy to literally create images out of words with Arabic calligraphy. My favorite, though, was the Sini calligraphy, a fusion of Arabic written to imitate Chinese script. The Sino-Arabic callipgraphy piece was done by Noor Deen Mi Guangjiang, who is apparantly the most famous Chinese Arabic calligrapher, and reads “assalamu alaikum” or “peace be with you.” Cultural fusion never ceases to amaze me.

Day Sixty-Six—San FranciscoThai lunch at Zaab; it was amazingly good with all local ingredients. Then Legion of Honor and de Young cause they were free today for BofA cardholders. Missed the Picasso gallery at de Young cause it sold out. Oh wells, maybe in August then. I actually enjoyed de Young this time; last time I went I found it kinda boring. I realized that, even though I love European culture and architecture, I absolutely detest their paintings and art (except for some Impressionism)—it’s just way too ornamentally flourished and excessive. It’s like I love either the reallyreallyreally old historic artifact arts or the superduper modern stuff. Like sculptures and abstract art. Like that one cast glass sculpture that I swore I was gonna remember but I forgot :( or the “Anti-Mass” made from the remains of a burned-down Black church. I’ve also come to love abstract art; I mean sure it’s not art per se, but I love it for the minimalist and aesthetics appeal. Sure anyone can splatter paint on a canvas and call it art, but it takes skill to make the design flow, kind of like interior designing or that super amazing Moses blood splatter from IV.
Day Sixty-Six—San FranciscoThai lunch at Zaab; it was amazingly good with all local ingredients. Then Legion of Honor and de Young cause they were free today for BofA cardholders. Missed the Picasso gallery at de Young cause it sold out. Oh wells, maybe in August then. I actually enjoyed de Young this time; last time I went I found it kinda boring. I realized that, even though I love European culture and architecture, I absolutely detest their paintings and art (except for some Impressionism)—it’s just way too ornamentally flourished and excessive. It’s like I love either the reallyreallyreally old historic artifact arts or the superduper modern stuff. Like sculptures and abstract art. Like that one cast glass sculpture that I swore I was gonna remember but I forgot :( or the “Anti-Mass” made from the remains of a burned-down Black church. I’ve also come to love abstract art; I mean sure it’s not art per se, but I love it for the minimalist and aesthetics appeal. Sure anyone can splatter paint on a canvas and call it art, but it takes skill to make the design flow, kind of like interior designing or that super amazing Moses blood splatter from IV.
Day Sixty-Six—San FranciscoThai lunch at Zaab; it was amazingly good with all local ingredients. Then Legion of Honor and de Young cause they were free today for BofA cardholders. Missed the Picasso gallery at de Young cause it sold out. Oh wells, maybe in August then. I actually enjoyed de Young this time; last time I went I found it kinda boring. I realized that, even though I love European culture and architecture, I absolutely detest their paintings and art (except for some Impressionism)—it’s just way too ornamentally flourished and excessive. It’s like I love either the reallyreallyreally old historic artifact arts or the superduper modern stuff. Like sculptures and abstract art. Like that one cast glass sculpture that I swore I was gonna remember but I forgot :( or the “Anti-Mass” made from the remains of a burned-down Black church. I’ve also come to love abstract art; I mean sure it’s not art per se, but I love it for the minimalist and aesthetics appeal. Sure anyone can splatter paint on a canvas and call it art, but it takes skill to make the design flow, kind of like interior designing or that super amazing Moses blood splatter from IV.
Day Sixty-Six—San FranciscoThai lunch at Zaab; it was amazingly good with all local ingredients. Then Legion of Honor and de Young cause they were free today for BofA cardholders. Missed the Picasso gallery at de Young cause it sold out. Oh wells, maybe in August then. I actually enjoyed de Young this time; last time I went I found it kinda boring. I realized that, even though I love European culture and architecture, I absolutely detest their paintings and art (except for some Impressionism)—it’s just way too ornamentally flourished and excessive. It’s like I love either the reallyreallyreally old historic artifact arts or the superduper modern stuff. Like sculptures and abstract art. Like that one cast glass sculpture that I swore I was gonna remember but I forgot :( or the “Anti-Mass” made from the remains of a burned-down Black church. I’ve also come to love abstract art; I mean sure it’s not art per se, but I love it for the minimalist and aesthetics appeal. Sure anyone can splatter paint on a canvas and call it art, but it takes skill to make the design flow, kind of like interior designing or that super amazing Moses blood splatter from IV.

Day Sixty-Six—San Francisco
Thai lunch at Zaab; it was amazingly good with all local ingredients. Then Legion of Honor and de Young cause they were free today for BofA cardholders. Missed the Picasso gallery at de Young cause it sold out. Oh wells, maybe in August then. I actually enjoyed de Young this time; last time I went I found it kinda boring. I realized that, even though I love European culture and architecture, I absolutely detest their paintings and art (except for some Impressionism)—it’s just way too ornamentally flourished and excessive. It’s like I love either the reallyreallyreally old historic artifact arts or the superduper modern stuff. Like sculptures and abstract art. Like that one cast glass sculpture that I swore I was gonna remember but I forgot :( or the “Anti-Mass” made from the remains of a burned-down Black church. I’ve also come to love abstract art; I mean sure it’s not art per se, but I love it for the minimalist and aesthetics appeal. Sure anyone can splatter paint on a canvas and call it art, but it takes skill to make the design flow, kind of like interior designing or that super amazing Moses blood splatter from IV.

designismymuse:

enochliew:Rainbow Church by Tokujin Yoshioka
Light is an infinite spectrum of colours, making it one of the most powerful tools in an architect’s arsenal.



This is amazing. First off, the simplicity of the building and its white walls coupled by the grandeur of the chapel and its high ceiling. I love how it’s illuminated by natural light through the use of shards of glass that create the spectral effect of rainbows that well-contrast the simplicity of the chapel.

designismymuse:

enochliew:Rainbow Church by Tokujin Yoshioka

Light is an infinite spectrum of colours, making it one of the most powerful tools in an architect’s arsenal.

This is amazing. First off, the simplicity of the building and its white walls coupled by the grandeur of the chapel and its high ceiling. I love how it’s illuminated by natural light through the use of shards of glass that create the spectral effect of rainbows that well-contrast the simplicity of the chapel.